Asset Management/Sustainability

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Assessment of Local Road Safety Funding, Training, and Technical Assistance url
The purpose of this report is to summarize State DOT practices for delivering safety funding and resources to local entities for road safety improvement projects. These practices were identified in large part through a questionnaire administered to State DOTs during this assessment. This report identifies model local road safety practices that can be implemented by State DOTs, local practitioners (i.e., public works directors, transportation directors, county engineers, transportation planners, and elected officials), Local Technical Assistance Programs (LTAP), and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) in any State.

Beyond The Short Term: Transportation Asset Management For Long-Term Sustainability, Accountability and Performance

Transportation Asset Management (TAM) has long been recognized as a sound, long-term approach to 
managing infrastructure. It provides decision makers with a rational, long-term systematic process for 
making difficult and complex decisions about how to achieve the highest system condition levels for the 
lowest cost, over the longest term. 
TAM also is evolving to help transportation officials address two new challenges. TAM provides a 
sound basis for demonstrating the long-term sustainability of current infrastructure practices. By using 
TAM as an over-arching framework, transportation executives can demonstrate that they are making 
decisions to sustain the transportation system to the best of their ability over the long term. 
Also, TAM can demonstrate accountability. TAM relies upon strategic long-term goals, the pursuit of 
measureable targets and the continuous evaluation of results. In this way, TAM not only produces shortterm performance metrics but it closely resembles "quality systems" such as Six Sigma which are 
widely recognized as leading to improved performance. TAM can be the foundation for performance 
measurement systems which assure not only short-term performance but also long-term sustainability. 
This report re-examines TAM as an approach for sustainability and as a system for greater 
accountability and improved performance. It also includes advice on Change Management practices to 
elevate and expand TAM practices within a department of transportation. 

Transportation Asset Management (TAM) has long been recognized as a sound, long-term approach to managing infrastructure. It provides decision makers with a rational, long-term systematic process for making difficult and complex decisions about how to achieve the highest system condition levels for the lowest cost, over the longest term. 

TAM also is evolving to help transportation officials address two new challenges. TAM provides a sound basis for demonstrating the long-term sustainability of current infrastructure practices. By using TAM as an over-arching framework, transportation executives can demonstrate that they are making decisions to sustain the transportation system to the best of their ability over the long term.

 Also, TAM can demonstrate accountability. TAM relies upon strategic long-term goals, the pursuit of measureable targets and the continuous evaluation of results. In this way, TAM not only produces shortterm performance metrics but it closely resembles "quality systems" such as Six Sigma which are widely recognized as leading to improved performance. TAM can be the foundation for performance measurement systems which assure not only short-term performance but also long-term sustainability. 

This report re-examines TAM as an approach for sustainability and as a system for greater accountability and improved performance. It also includes advice on Change Management practices to elevate and expand TAM practices within a department of transportation. Message from the Director. Butch Wlaschin. Office of Asset Management. Federal Highway Administration.