Policies, SOPs, and Other Links and Publications of Interest

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The UNH Technology Transfer Center (T2) hosts several examples of Policies and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) from local sources, as well as links to outside resources that may be of interest. The collection is organized by subject matter.  We're pleased to offer the below examples as a jumping-off point for your own research, but UNH T2 not own or manage the content, and therefore can’t advise on or support the current accuracy or completeness of the information provided. 

If you have questions or would like to submit a document or resource, please call 603-862-2826 or email t2.center@unh.edu

Topics

Assessment of Local Road Safety Funding, Training, and Technical Assistance url
The purpose of this report is to summarize State DOT practices for delivering safety funding and resources to local entities for road safety improvement projects. These practices were identified in large part through a questionnaire administered to State DOTs during this assessment. This report identifies model local road safety practices that can be implemented by State DOTs, local practitioners (i.e., public works directors, transportation directors, county engineers, transportation planners, and elected officials), Local Technical Assistance Programs (LTAP), and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) in any State.

Beyond The Short Term: Transportation Asset Management For Long-Term Sustainability, Accountability and Performance

Transportation Asset Management (TAM) has long been recognized as a sound, long-term approach to 
managing infrastructure. It provides decision makers with a rational, long-term systematic process for 
making difficult and complex decisions about how to achieve the highest system condition levels for the 
lowest cost, over the longest term. 
TAM also is evolving to help transportation officials address two new challenges. TAM provides a 
sound basis for demonstrating the long-term sustainability of current infrastructure practices. By using 
TAM as an over-arching framework, transportation executives can demonstrate that they are making 
decisions to sustain the transportation system to the best of their ability over the long term. 
Also, TAM can demonstrate accountability. TAM relies upon strategic long-term goals, the pursuit of 
measureable targets and the continuous evaluation of results. In this way, TAM not only produces shortterm performance metrics but it closely resembles "quality systems" such as Six Sigma which are 
widely recognized as leading to improved performance. TAM can be the foundation for performance 
measurement systems which assure not only short-term performance but also long-term sustainability. 
This report re-examines TAM as an approach for sustainability and as a system for greater 
accountability and improved performance. It also includes advice on Change Management practices to 
elevate and expand TAM practices within a department of transportation. 

Transportation Asset Management (TAM) has long been recognized as a sound, long-term approach to managing infrastructure. It provides decision makers with a rational, long-term systematic process for making difficult and complex decisions about how to achieve the highest system condition levels for the lowest cost, over the longest term. 

TAM also is evolving to help transportation officials address two new challenges. TAM provides a sound basis for demonstrating the long-term sustainability of current infrastructure practices. By using TAM as an over-arching framework, transportation executives can demonstrate that they are making decisions to sustain the transportation system to the best of their ability over the long term.

 Also, TAM can demonstrate accountability. TAM relies upon strategic long-term goals, the pursuit of measureable targets and the continuous evaluation of results. In this way, TAM not only produces shortterm performance metrics but it closely resembles "quality systems" such as Six Sigma which are widely recognized as leading to improved performance. TAM can be the foundation for performance measurement systems which assure not only short-term performance but also long-term sustainability. 

This report re-examines TAM as an approach for sustainability and as a system for greater accountability and improved performance. It also includes advice on Change Management practices to elevate and expand TAM practices within a department of transportation. Message from the Director. Butch Wlaschin. Office of Asset Management. Federal Highway Administration.  

Inspection

Maintenance

 

 

Drone  Academy- training with UNH Professional Development and Training

Event Management Resources

General

Managing a diverse road network requires lots of tools in your toolbox!  Effective winter road maintenance might include the use of products such as sand, crushed stone, salt, or brine - individually or in combination with other treatments (such as the use of a mixed 3/8” stone and winter sand on gravel roads).  Factors that determine which method is recommended include road condition, road surface (paved, gravel, or dirt), weather conditions and forecast (precipitation rate, type, temperature), posted speed, and sensitivity to environmental ecology and residential areas.  Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Department of Transportation (DOT) and other highway and public works organizations offer a variety of publications to educate road practitioners on best practices and decision making in regards to which materials to use -sand, abrasives, salt, or other chemical deicers; when; and in what quantities.  A material such as crushed stone may be effective on gravel roads but is generally not recommended on paved roads.  Using sand may be necessary during extreme cold and icing events, but could impact streams during rain or runoff events.  Awareness of MS4 and silica dust impact, including in and around our critical water streams, is of importance. 

While we cannot escape winter in New Hampshire, and although there isn’t a one size fits all approach, understanding the unique strengths of each method of winter maintenance and knowing the roadways in their communities can allow public works professionals to effectively use road treatments to maintain passable roads while minimizing environmental impact and maximizing winter maintenance budgets.

We welcome you to review some of the many great resources shared on this topic:

  • Concrete Pavement Preservation video from FHWA explains a long-term strategy of applying timely and appropriate preventive treatments to maintain good pavement condition and extend pavement life. The video reviews five preservation techniques—joint resealing and crack sealing, diamond grinding, grooving, load-transfer restoration and cross-stitching, and partial and full-depth repairs—and explains how a county applied the treatments on a maintenance project. 
  • UNH SADES program - manages SADES Road Surface Management System (RSMS) and training.  SADES RSMS is a program originally created by T2 to aid municipalities in inventorying their road networks, forecasting repairs, and estimating budgets.